Riek Machar Is Back Pushing Peace in South Sudan, but for How Long?

South Sudan’s opposition leader, Riek Machar, center-left, is greeted as he arrives at the airport in Juba, South Sudan, Oct. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Bullen Chol).
South Sudan’s opposition leader, Riek Machar, center-left, is greeted as he arrives at the airport in Juba, South Sudan, Oct. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Bullen Chol).
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Editor’s Note: Every Friday, WPR Senior Editor Robbie Corey-Boulet curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. “I came only to confirm to people that I am for peace. The past is gone. We have opened a new chapter for peace and unity.” That was Riek Machar, South Sudan’s opposition leader and former vice president, who returned to the war-torn country Wednesday after more than two years away. His upbeat tone was matched by President Salva Kiir, who similarly described the event as a turning point in a civil war that’s nearly five years old and, […]

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