Protests Against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Go Global

People gather in Trafalgar Square during a Black Lives Matter rally, London, June 12, 2020 (AP photo by Alberto Pezzali).
People gather in Trafalgar Square during a Black Lives Matter rally, London, June 12, 2020 (AP photo by Alberto Pezzali).
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In this week’s editors’ discussion on Trend Lines, WPR’s Judah Grunstein, Freddy Deknatel and Prachi Vidwans talk about the protests against police brutality and systemic racism in the United States and Europe, and the issues and grievances driving them. They also discuss what these movements share in common and what distinguishes them, the central role played by commemorative statues as legacies of historical racism, and the particular challenge the U.S. protests pose for civil-military relations. Listen: Download: MP3 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | RSS | Spotify Relevant Articles on WPR:America’s Struggle for Racial Justice Is a Barrier—and a Bridge—to the WorldAmerica […]

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