Political and Economic Crises Could Trip Up Brazil’s Climate Change Follow-Through

Cracked earth at the almost empty Itaim dam, Itu, Brazil, Oct. 30, 2014 (AP photo by Andre Penner).
Cracked earth at the almost empty Itaim dam, Itu, Brazil, Oct. 30, 2014 (AP photo by Andre Penner).
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Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on countries’ risk exposure, contribution and response to climate change. During the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympic Games, Brazil showed a video that highlighted the risks the planet faces—higher temperatures, rising sea levels and melting ice sheets—because of climate change, winning the country praise from environmental advocates. In an email interview, Carlos Rittl, the executive secretary at the Climate Observatory in Sao Paulo, discussed Brazil’s climate change policy. WPR: What is Brazil’s risk exposure to climate change, what effects of climate change are already apparent, and what sorts […]

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