Ouattara’s Power Grab Renews Fears of Violence in a Divided Cote d’Ivoire

Demonstrators opposed to President Alassane Ouattara running for a third term confront riot police in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, Aug. 13, 2020 (AP photo by Diomande Ble Blonde).
Demonstrators opposed to President Alassane Ouattara running for a third term confront riot police in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, Aug. 13, 2020 (AP photo by Diomande Ble Blonde).

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso—Daleba Nahounou was a university student in Abidjan, the largest city in Cote d’Ivoire, when a disputed presidential election in 2010 sent rival militias onto the streets.* The ensuing months of violence claimed 3,000 lives across the country and led to an international war crimes tribunal. “It was tragic,” Nahounou, who now helps lead a civil society organization called the Coalition of the Indignant of Cote d’Ivoire, told World Politics Review. “We have the same feeling that it could happen today.” Tensions are high in the country after President Alassane Ouattara, the opposition candidate and eventual victor in […]

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