Orban’s Anti-LGBTQ Law Crosses a Red Line for Europe

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban leaves at the end of an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, June 25, 2021 (AP photo by Olivier Matthys).
Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban leaves at the end of an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, June 25, 2021 (AP photo by Olivier Matthys).
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Violations of democratic norms by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban are nothing new, but the explosion of anger in Europe against the anti-LGBTQ law just approved by the Hungarian parliament, dominated by Orban’s Fidesz Party, suggests Orban has crossed a critical red line. At last week’s European Union summit, no topic garnered more attention, or more fury, than the new law. If descriptions of what went on behind the scenes are accurate, Orban was berated with an uncommon degree of emotional intensity. Leaders of countries from across the EU lambasted Hungary’s self-described proponent of “illiberal democracy” in starkly personal terms—tears […]

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