On Iran, U.S. Torn Between Supporting Israel and Fighting IS

On Iran, U.S. Torn Between Supporting Israel and Fighting IS
A pro-Israel demonstrator waves flags near the Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 3, 2015 (AP photo by Cliff Owen).

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to the U.S. Congress this week slammed U.S. President Barack Obama’s quest for a nuclear agreement with Iran, unleashing a political firestorm in Washington. While the speech did not compel anyone to shift their position on the Obama policy, it dramatically amplified the debate, with each side fully convinced that Netanyahu made his case or failed to do so. That the United States has been unable to manage its conflict with Iran, or even implement a coherent policy, reflects the intricate complexity of the issue—with its multiple components, clashing priorities and impassioned domestic political […]

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