Chad’s Post-Deby ‘Transition’ Is Heating Up

People protest against the rule of a transitional military council headed by the son of the late President Idriss Deby, in N’Djamena, Chad, April 27, 2021 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).
People protest against the rule of a transitional military council headed by the son of the late President Idriss Deby, in N’Djamena, Chad, April 27, 2021 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).
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Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. Subscribers can adjust their newsletter settings to receive Africa Watch by email every week. Three weeks after President Idriss Deby was killed in battle in late April, the transitional military council that seized control of Chad in the wake of his death moved to solidify its hold on power this week, naming a new government filled with holdovers from Deby’s regime. The move by the council, which is headed by the former president’s son, Mahamat Idriss Deby, threatens to fuel tensions in […]

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