Olympic Reformers Could Take a Page From U.N. Counterparts’ Playbook

Chinese gold medal winner Sun Yang during the medal ceremony for the men's 200-meter freestyle final, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Aug. 8, 2016 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
Chinese gold medal winner Sun Yang during the medal ceremony for the men's 200-meter freestyle final, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Aug. 8, 2016 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
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So far, the Olympic Games in Rio are off to a good start. No major disasters have occurred, despite serious worries about security and environmental conditions. But the games—and particularly the downsides like excessive costs, corruption and imbalances of power and influence—have raised questions of politics and economics that bear many similarities to some of the major trends in international affairs. One innovative proposal for fixing the Olympics provides a useful comparison to some notions of how to improve the global governance system. Hosting the Olympics has already been costly for Brazil—in financial terms for sure, at $12 billion, of […]

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