No More ‘-Isms’: A Non-Ideological Generation Takes to the Streets in the Middle East

Algerian students take to the streets to protest against the government, Algiers, Oct. 29, 2019 (AP photo by Fateh Guidoum).
Algerian students take to the streets to protest against the government, Algiers, Oct. 29, 2019 (AP photo by Fateh Guidoum).

Mass protests are unfolding across the Middle East and North Africa, as demonstrators take to the streets to decry a wide range of social and political ills. From Algiers to Khartoum, Beirut to Baghdad, the list of grievances includes rampant corruption, economic malaise, oppression and sectarian divisions. The protests have already resulted in the ouster of two leaders this year, in Sudan and Algeria. In other countries, demonstrators have clashed with security forces, resulting in hundreds of deaths and injuries, and many more arrests. Given their wide geographic scope, the protests have drawn comparisons to the Arab uprisings that swept […]

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