New Zealand’s Quick Action on Gun Control May Not Yield the Best Results

Police acting superintendent Mike McIlraith shows New Zealand lawmakers in Wellington an AR-15 style rifle, on April 2, 2019 (AP photo by Nick Perry).
Police acting superintendent Mike McIlraith shows New Zealand lawmakers in Wellington an AR-15 style rifle, on April 2, 2019 (AP photo by Nick Perry).

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an ongoing series on gun policy and the debate over gun control around the world. New Zealand is set to ban certain types of semi-automatic weapons following last month’s mass shooting that killed 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch. This week, new gun control legislation passed the first of three votes in Parliament. Many commentators have compared the situation to what happened in Australia in 1996, when strict new gun laws were enacted in the wake of a deadly mass shooting that shocked the country. But studies looking at the effectiveness of […]

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