Nagorno-Karabakh Elections an Exercise in Domestic Legitimacy

View of Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, Oct. 17, 2006 (photo by Flickr user hanming_huang licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license).
View of Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, Oct. 17, 2006 (photo by Flickr user hanming_huang licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license).

Earlier this month, Azerbaijan’s separatist Nagorno-Karabakh region held parliamentary elections, which were denounced by Azerbaijan, the European Union and the United States. In an email interview, Laurence Broers, editor of Caucasus Survey and a research associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, discussed governance in Nagorno-Karabakh. WPR: What are the dominant political parties in Nagorno-Karabakh, and are their platforms locally determined or driven by broader Armenian political trends? Laurence Broers: Political parties in Nagorno-Karabakh show many of the same features as those across the wider region: Hard to distinguish ideologically, they are instead personality-driven and […]

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