As Myanmar’s Crisis Gets Bloodier, the World Still Looks Away

remnants of an attack in myanmar's civil war
Debris and soot cover the floor of a middle school in Let Yet Kone village the day after an air strike hit it, in the Sagaing region of Myanmar, Sept. 17, 2022 (AP photo).

A massacre committed on Sept. 16 by Myanmar’s military, in which 11 children died, is consistent with the junta’s strategy to regain control of the country. The regime’s scorched-earth campaign is focusing on areas dominated by rebel units and those loyal to the opposition government in exile, the National Unity Government.

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