Many Syrian Refugees Aren’t Going Anywhere. They Need the Right to Work

Many Syrian Refugees Aren’t Going Anywhere. They Need the Right to Work
The Oncupinar camp for Syrian refugees near the border town of Kilis in southeastern Turkey, June 20, 2016 (AP photo by Emrah Gurel).

After five years of relentless conflict and human tragedy, the world has begun to sense the permanence of Syria’s refugee crisis. Those who have fled violence are unlikely to return home anytime soon. Instead of seeing the crisis through a purely humanitarian prism, focusing on aid and resettlement, host countries and international donors are now looking more at how to provide sustainable livelihoods and integrate Syrians into their host communities, in particular by bringing them into the workforce. In countries like Turkey, which hosts some 2.7 million registered Syrian refugees, and Jordan, which hosts more than 650,000, creating a legal […]

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