Local Elections in Guinea Reveal Sources of Tension That Resonate Nationwide

A man shows an injury he sustained at a rally in support of then-UFDG presidential candidate Cellou Dalein Diallo, Conakry, Guinea, Oct. 8, 2015 (AP photo by Youssouf Bah).
A man shows an injury he sustained at a rally in support of then-UFDG presidential candidate Cellou Dalein Diallo, Conakry, Guinea, Oct. 8, 2015 (AP photo by Youssouf Bah).

In early February, Guineans voted in municipal elections for the first time in well over a decade. Though such contests necessarily hinge on local dynamics, taken together they can reveal nationwide trends and challenges, and that’s been especially true in Guinea’s case. The extensive delay in holding the vote, and the unrest that has prevailed in the weeks since ballots were cast, offer insight into the main threats to the West African nation’s stability, as well as what to expect as President Alpha Conde approaches the end of his second term—his last under the constitution. The last time voters in […]

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