Libya’s Power-Sharing Deal Is a Race Against Time—and Against ISIS

The signing of a U.N.-sponsored deal forming a unity government and aiming to end Libya's conflict, Dec. 17, 2015, Sikhrat, Morocco (AP photo by Abdeljalil Bounhar).
The signing of a U.N.-sponsored deal forming a unity government and aiming to end Libya's conflict, Dec. 17, 2015, Sikhrat, Morocco (AP photo by Abdeljalil Bounhar).
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On Dec. 17, dozens of delegates from Libya’s two rival parliaments, as well as from local municipalities and civil society, signed a United Nations-brokered deal to form a national unity government and hopefully halt the country’s long descent into unrest and civil war. Talks had been ongoing for almost a year, with plenty of obstacles along the way. But almost a month on, the agreement’s prospects are decidedly mixed. The nascent Government of National Accord has yet to be fully formed. A nine-member presidential council is up and running, although working mostly from Tunis. Overall, the power-sharing process outlined in […]

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