Latin America Needs More Than Elections to Solidify Democracy

People protest against a decision by Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City, Aug. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Oliver de Ros).
People protest against a decision by Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales to shut down the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity, CICIG, at Constitution Square in Guatemala City, Aug. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Oliver de Ros).
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Across Latin America, countries have come a long way in building democratic institutions. Most hold competitive and inclusive elections, for example. But the pervasive presence of organized crime and corruption has made progress in other areas, like the rule of law, difficult, leaving trust in the state almost nonexistent in many parts of Latin American. Kevin Casas-Zamora, secretary-general of the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, joins Peter Dörrie to discuss these issues, as well as the region’s reaction to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, given Moscow’s attempts over the past two decades to strengthen its ties to Latin […]

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