Is It Really a ‘New Myanmar’ Under the National League for Democracy?

Myanmar’s new president, Htin Kyaw, left, during a handover ceremony with outgoing President Thein Sein, Naypyidaw, March 30, 2016 (AP/Pool photo by Ye Aung Thu).
Myanmar’s new president, Htin Kyaw, left, during a handover ceremony with outgoing President Thein Sein, Naypyidaw, March 30, 2016 (AP/Pool photo by Ye Aung Thu).
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Free Newsletter

On April 1, a new civilian government in Myanmar, headed by the long-time opposition National League for Democracy (NLD), assumed power after more than a half-century of military rule. The NLD’s victory in last year’s elections was touted as an historic feat, and the party has signaled that it will undertake significant political, economic and social changes in the coming years. But it is likely to face major challenges as it seeks to implement them, especially from an army that is still a potent political force. Since coming to power following an opening under the ruling junta in 2011, the […]

TO READ MORE

Enter your email to get instant access to this article and to receive our free email newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having your own personal researcher and analyst for news and events around the globe. Become a member now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of 15,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Daily links to must-read news, analysis, and opinion from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • Weekly in-depth reports, including features on important countries and issues.
  • Your choice of weekly region-specific newsletters, delivered to your inbox.
  • Smartphone- and tablet-friendly website.

And all of this is available to you — right now for just $12 for the first 12 weeks.

More World Politics Review