Indonesia’s Jokowi Must Balance Between Non-Alignment and U.S. Overtures

Indonesian President Joko Widodo, popularly known as “Jokowi,” attends a graduation ceremony of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme at the Anglo Chinese School (International) in Singapore, Nov. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Wong Maye-E).
Indonesian President Joko Widodo, popularly known as “Jokowi,” attends a graduation ceremony of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme at the Anglo Chinese School (International) in Singapore, Nov. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Wong Maye-E).
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Last week, Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo was declared the winner of Indonesia’s presidential election after a hard-fought race with Prabowo Subianto, a former general. Widodo, popularly known as Jokowi, is a self-styled populist seen as representing a break with the country’s military-dominated past, but he has also indicated a desire to boost defense spending and build up Indonesia as a regional power. And although Subianto has alleged widespread electoral fraud and so far refused to concede, U.S. leaders have signaled their desire to work with Widodo. In a statement congratulating Widodo on his election and praising Indonesian democracy, U.S. Secretary […]

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