In Training Partner Militaries, U.S. Should Not Rush to ‘Do Something’ in Africa

1st Lt. Salvatore Buzzurro, USARAF military mentor, works with members of the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces on basic soldiering skills in preparation for the African Union Mission in Somalia (U.S. Army Africa photo).
1st Lt. Salvatore Buzzurro, USARAF military mentor, works with members of the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces on basic soldiering skills in preparation for the African Union Mission in Somalia (U.S. Army Africa photo).
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As African heads of state gather in Washington this week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the continent looks relatively peaceful, at least in comparison to other regions. Even the agenda of the summit, which according to its website “will advance the Administration’s focus on trade and investment in Africa,” reflects Africa’s relative stability. Though peace and security issues are admittedly included in the agenda, they seem more like a footnote than a priority. It is irrefutable that conflict in Africa has declined significantly over the past two decades and that African economies and the continent’s burgeoning middle classes represent a […]

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