AMLO’s Justice Reforms Risk Undoing Mexico’s Progress

A member of the Mexican security forces stands guard near City Hall in Villa Union, an area previously patrolled by Mexican marines until President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador reassigned them to other duties, Dec. 3, 2019. (AP photo by Eduardo Verdugo).
A member of the Mexican security forces stands guard near City Hall in Villa Union, an area previously patrolled by Mexican marines until President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador reassigned them to other duties, Dec. 3, 2019. (AP photo by Eduardo Verdugo).

MEXICO CITY—Mexico’s left-leaning president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, took office in December 2018 vowing to demilitarize his country’s war on drugs and tackle its wave of violent crime with a policy of “hugs, not bullets.” Yet his first full year in office saw 35,588 homicides committed nationwide, breaking the previous record for the third year in a row. In one of the more high-profile atrocities, nine members of a prominent Mexican-American Mormon family were massacred in November, including six children. The spiraling violence, along with AMLO’s failed promises to address it, has rekindled a long-running debate in Mexico over how […]

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