The Crisis in Mali Holds Important Lessons for Governments Everywhere

Demonstrators hold a placard in French reading, “This regime is a coronavirus for Mali,” as they protest in, Bamako, Mali, June 5, 2020 (AP photo by Baba Ahmed).
Demonstrators hold a placard in French reading, “This regime is a coronavirus for Mali,” as they protest in, Bamako, Mali, June 5, 2020 (AP photo by Baba Ahmed).

In recent weeks, Mali has been beset with mass protests against President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita’s government. At times, tens of thousands of people have poured into the streets of the capital, Bamako, to demand Keita’s resignation. The protests’ organizers, calling themselves the June 5 Movement after the date of the first demonstration, have brought together opposition political parties, religious groups, civil society organizations, trade unions and even members of the police. These disparate elements of Malian society are uniting around their deep anger at entrenched poverty and unemployment, the government’s ineffectual response to the coronavirus pandemic, and the rapid deterioration […]

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