In Madagascar, Cattle Theft Is Lucrative, Violent and Hard to Address

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Men dig for water in the dry Mandrare river bed, in Fenoaivo, Madagascar, Nov. 9, 2020 (AP photo by Laetitia Bezain).
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At least 32 people were killed in a July 29 attack by suspected cattle thieves in a village approximately 47 miles north of Antananarivo, Madagascar’s capital. While the country’s president has vowed to bring the killers to justice, the roots of Madagascar’s cattle theft problem date back decades and defy obvious solutions.

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