Haiti Is Slowly Becoming an Autocracy

A protest rally to demand the resignation of President Jovenel Moise, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Feb. 28, 2021 (AP photo by Dieu Nalio Chery).
A protest rally to demand the resignation of President Jovenel Moise, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Feb. 28, 2021 (AP photo by Dieu Nalio Chery).

Since February 2019, when President Jovenel Moise was implicated in the largest corruption scandal Haiti has ever known, the country has been mired in a violent crisis with political, economic and constitutional dimensions. Instead of heeding protesters’ demands to step down or addressing the allegations against him, Moise formed alliances with armed gangs that continue to terrorize the population and quash anti-government demonstrations. Moise, who has been ruling by decree since July 2018 due to his inability to form a government, has also eviscerated the independent institutions that could hold him and his allies accountable. He is clinging to power […]

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