In Canada, Infrastructure Projects Are Endangering Indigenous Women and Children

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline, take part in a rally in Smithers, British Columbia, Jan. 10, 2020 (Photo by Jason Franson for The Canadian Press via AP Images).
Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline, take part in a rally in Smithers, British Columbia, Jan. 10, 2020 (Photo by Jason Franson for The Canadian Press via AP Images).
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MONTREAL—On Feb. 10, Karla Tait was arrested in northern British Columbia while participating in a ceremony along the path of a multi-billion-dollar pipeline project to honor missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police accused Tait and other members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation of violating an injunction preventing them from blocking construction on the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The project passes through an area where members of the Unist’ot’en clan, a sub-group of the Wet’suwet’en peoples, have set up a traditional healing center and camp to reclaim their ancestral lands and protest the pipeline’s construction. The road […]

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