In Aftermath of Last Year’s Unrest, Oaxaca Still Struggles

In Aftermath of Last Year’s Unrest, Oaxaca Still Struggles

OAXACA, Mexico -- The grim images of tear gas and street battles that were streaming out of Oaxaca late last year nearly dissuaded Spanish-language student Hermann Ingjaldsson from coming to the southern Mexican state, where a teachers' strike had descended into a revolt against the governor.

"I looked it up on YouTube and it didn't look good," the native of Iceland recalled one quiet evening while poring over his notes.

At the urging of a Mexican friend, he came anyway and found the reality entirely different from the unfavorable videos shot in the colonial city and state of the same name.

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