How to Halt Nigeria’s School Kidnapping Crisis

How to Halt Nigeria’s School Kidnapping Crisis
Students who were abducted by gunmen in Zamfara state after their release, in Gusau, northern Nigeria, March 2, 2021 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).

Nigeria is once again facing a challenge that has grown all too familiar: children in peril. Kidnappings first gained international prominence in 2014, when the jihadist group Boko Haram abducted 276 schoolgirls from their boarding school in the northeastern town of Chibok. Despite a global media campaign to urge their safe return, #BringBackOurGirls, more than 100 of them are still missing today. Many more children have been abducted since then—and the trend could get even worse. Over the past four months, armed groups have raided boarding schools and kidnapped more than 650 students. In perhaps the most prominent of these […]

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