How the U.S. Can Capitalize on a Budding Egypt-Saudi Alliance

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi meets with Saudi King Salman, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 2, 2015 (Egyptian Presidency via AP).
Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi meets with Saudi King Salman, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 2, 2015 (Egyptian Presidency via AP).

The governments of Egypt and Saudi Arabia, arguably the Arab world’s two most influential states, continue to express their determination to strengthen an alliance that has grown under Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi. In late July, el-Sisi and Saudi Defense Minister and Deputy Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman signed a deal they called the Cairo Declaration, a strategic blueprint to advance bilateral cooperation in a host of areas, especially defense and the economy. Since 2013, Saudi Arabia and other Arab Gulf states have helped keep el-Sisi’s regime afloat, with billions in economic aid. Egypt, in turn, has been a partner in […]

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