How Soleimani’s Assassination Is Upending Iraq’s Foreign Policy

A protester waves the national flag near Tahrir Square during a demonstration against an Iranian missile strike, in Baghdad, Iraq, Jan. 8, 2020 (AP photo by Khalid Mohammed).
A protester waves the national flag near Tahrir Square during a demonstration against an Iranian missile strike, in Baghdad, Iraq, Jan. 8, 2020 (AP photo by Khalid Mohammed).

Nearly a week after the United States military assassinated Qassem Soleimani, a top Iranian general who headed the elite Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, in Baghdad, a huge rift has opened up in the U.S. relationship with Iraq. A high-ranking Iraqi militia commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, was also killed in the U.S. strike, angering many Iraqis. And on Sunday, the Iraqi parliament passed a nonbinding resolution urging the government to expel U.S. troops from Iraq, although the Trump administration insists it plans to stay. For this week’s interview on Trend Lines, WPR’s Elliot Waldman is joined by […]

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