How Russia Uses Stealth Misinformation to Polarize Electorates Worldwide

How Russia Uses Stealth Misinformation to Polarize Electorates Worldwide
A collection of posts that were removed from Instagram after Facebook, the owner of Instagram, concluded that they originated from Russia and had links to the Internet Research Agency, photographed in Washington, March 4, 2020 (AP photo by Jon Elswick).

Foreign interference in this year’s U.S. election may not be as rampant as it was in 2016, but various Russian actors are adopting more sophisticated tactics, says Shelby Grossman, a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. One new method, which the Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency workshopped with a series of operations in African countries last year, is to outsource its content creation to local journalists and organizations. Grossman joined WPR’s Elliot Waldman on the Trend Lines podcast this week to talk about how these tactics are being used to polarize electorates in the U.S. and around the world.

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