How Is Brazil’s Involvement in U.N. Peacekeeping Reshaping Its Foreign Policy?

A U.N. peacekeeper from Brazil attends the end of operations ceremony for the United Nations Stabilization Mission, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Oct. 5, 2017 (AP photo by Dieu Nalio Chery).
A U.N. peacekeeper from Brazil attends the end of operations ceremony for the United Nations Stabilization Mission, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Oct. 5, 2017 (AP photo by Dieu Nalio Chery).
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In late November, the United Nations undersecretary-general for peacekeeping operations, Jean-Pierre La Croix, asked Brazil to contribute troops to the U.N. mission in the Central African Republic. This week, Brazil reportedly agreed to that request. Though it has traditionally eschewed military interventionism, Brazil has assumed an increasingly prominent role in peacekeeping missions in recent years. In an email interview, Kai Michael Kenkel, an associate professor at the Institute of International Relations at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, discusses Brazil’s engagement in peacekeeping operations and how this plays politically at home. WPR: What is the recent history of […]

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