How Germany Is Fulfilling Its Commitments to the Paris Climate Deal

Smoke streams from the chimneys of a coal-fired power station, Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Nov. 24, 2014 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
Smoke streams from the chimneys of a coal-fired power station, Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Nov. 24, 2014 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
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Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on countries’ risk exposure, contribution and response to climate change. Earlier this month, the U.N.’s special envoy on climate change accused Germany of going against the Paris climate agreement by financing the fossil fuel industry through subsidies. In an email interview, Daniel Klingenfeld, the head of the director’s staff at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, discusses Germany’s climate change policy. WPR: How big of an issue is climate change domestically in Germany, and what role does Germany play in EU and international efforts to address climate change? […]

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