Guterres Has to Be Ready for the U.N.’s Bad Luck to Get Worse

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres speaks during a press conference, Nairobi, Kenya, March 8, 2017 (AP photo by Khalil Senosi).
U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres speaks during a press conference, Nairobi, Kenya, March 8, 2017 (AP photo by Khalil Senosi).

Napoleon allegedly said that he liked his generals to be lucky. If he were around today to apply the same logic to secretaries-general of the United Nations, he might have some concerns about Antonio Guterres. The new U.N. chief, who has now been in office for 100 days, is clearly an energetic and dedicated leader. But he has had a run of very bad luck indeed. The number and variety of crises that have sprung up around the U.N. since the start of the year is remarkable. Famine is looming in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. The new U.S. […]

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