Ghana’s Democracy Delivered. Can Its New President?

Ghanaians line up to cast their votes during last month's elections, Kibi, eastern Ghana, Dec. 7, 2016 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).
Ghanaians line up to cast their votes during last month's elections, Kibi, eastern Ghana, Dec. 7, 2016 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).

On Jan. 7, opposition leader Nana Akufo-Addo took office as the president of Ghana, a month after defeating incumbent President John Mahama in a smooth presidential election that again boosted Ghana’s democratic reputation. December’s vote represented an exception at a time of electoral and political turmoil in other parts of Africa, most recently in nearby Gambia. Akufo-Addo’s successful campaign had many features, but the most notable was his populist message. It now remains to be seen whether “the farmer who struggles to feed his family,” “the mother of the sick child,” and those “who . . . are forced to […]

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