Germany’s Plain-Speaking ‘Man in New York’ Had a Good Run at the U.N.

Christoph Heusgen, Germany's U.N. ambassador and then-president of the Security Council, resets an hourglass between speakers at United Nations headquarters in New York, April 29, 2019 (AP photo by Richard Drew).
Christoph Heusgen, Germany's U.N. ambassador and then-president of the Security Council, resets an hourglass between speakers at United Nations headquarters in New York, April 29, 2019 (AP photo by Richard Drew).

Editor’s note: Guest columnist Richard Gowan is filling in for Stewart Patrick, who will return on July 12. The United Nations diplomatic corps is about to say farewell to one of its best-known members. Christoph Heusgen, Germany’s permanent representative in New York since 2017, departs at the end of June. During his tenure, which included a stint on the Security Council in 2019 and 2020, Heusgen has impressed and sometimes infuriated other diplomats with his plain-speaking, principled brand of diplomacy. He will be missed. Heusgen has always cut an unusual figure among other ambassadors, as he came to the U.N. […]

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