From 7,000 Miles Away, Afghans Anxiously Watch U.S. Presidential Election

From 7,000 Miles Away, Afghans Anxiously Watch U.S. Presidential Election

MAZAR-E-SHARIF, Afghanistan -- As the United States prepares for its presidential election, many Afghans are anxiously watching the race that will bring an end to the administration that triggered the 2001 U.S. intervention in their country and that has designed much of the continued military and development strategy there.

Given that Afghanistan, one of the poorest countries in the world, has become almost completely dependent on the foreign assistance the U.S. intervention has brought, Afghans perhaps have good reason for their anxiety.

"The important issues to Afghans are Afghanistan -- and Pakistan," said 29 year-old Roya Aziz, an Afghan-American filmmaker who moved back to Kabul from California in 2005. "Afghans want a president who will lead the international community in maintaining its political will and aid assistance in rebuilding Afghanistan, and someone who will take a hard line towards the Pakistani regime because insurgents are enjoying logistical, moral and financial support from elements within Pakistan."

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