Four Ways Biden Can Reinvigorate the U.N.

Then-Vice President Joe Biden chairs a summit on international peacekeeping operations on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters in New York, Sept. 26, 2014 (AP photo by Jason DeCrow).
Then-Vice President Joe Biden chairs a summit on international peacekeeping operations on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters in New York, Sept. 26, 2014 (AP photo by Jason DeCrow).

Over the past four years, America’s relationship with the United Nations underwent a dramatic shift, as the U.S. undermined, withdrew from or threatened withdrawal from some of the most important multilateral organizations, processes and accords. These include the Iran nuclear deal, the Paris climate agreement, the U.N. Human Rights Council, the World Health Organization and the World Trade Organization, to name a few. But it isn’t just America that drew away from multilateralism. Major and middle powers around the world have distanced themselves from multilateral institutions to embrace more naked forms of nationalism. This has led to greater risks of […]

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