American ‘Battlespace’: The Military’s Reckoning With Racism and Politicization

Utah National Guard soldiers face off with demonstrators who had gathered to protest the death of George Floyd, near the White House, Washington, June 3, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
Utah National Guard soldiers face off with demonstrators who had gathered to protest the death of George Floyd, near the White House, Washington, June 3, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).

The past two weeks may have marked a turning point in American civil-military relations. President Donald Trump threatened to deploy active-duty troops to subdue domestic political protests; the secretary of defense suggested governors should “dominate the battlespace” of major U.S. cities, only to later walk back his remarks; and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, the country’s highest-ranking military officer, appeared alongside Trump at a photo-op near the White House after National Guard troops had helped forcibly clear the area of protesters. Milley later apologized, saying he “should not have been there.” Although these events […]

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