Ecuador’s Protests Leave Lasso in a Catch-22

A man draped with an Ecuadorean flag protests next to a burning barricade, Santa Rosa, Ecuador, June 14, 2022 (AP photo by Dolores Ochoa).
A man draped with an Ecuadorean flag protests next to a burning barricade, Santa Rosa, Ecuador, June 14, 2022 (AP photo by Dolores Ochoa).

On June 30, the government of Ecuadorian President Guillermo Lasso reached an agreement with the country’s leading Indigenous organization, the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador, or Conaie, and other civil society organizations to bring an end to social protests that had ground the country to a standstill for 18 days. The protests, which began in rural areas and later converged on Quito, the capital, were triggered by rising fuel prices and escalating inflation. But they took place against the backdrop of a surge in violent crime linked with drug trafficking, exacerbated by a deteriorating justice system limiting the government’s efforts to […]

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