Five Years After Tahrir Square, the Lessons From Egypt’s Failed Revolution

Supporters of Egyptian President el-Sisi mark Police Day, which falls on the anniversary of the 2011 uprising, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 25, 2016 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
Supporters of Egyptian President el-Sisi mark Police Day, which falls on the anniversary of the 2011 uprising, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 25, 2016 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
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The fifth anniversary of Egypt’s failed democratic revolution came and went this week, without mass protests or visible signs of popular upheaval. There was, however, one unmistakable sign that the symbolically charged date was approaching: Security forces had gone into overdrive in the days and weeks leading up to the anniversary, intensifying a crackdown that reveals the one truth that President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi would prefer to keep quiet: Although the revolution has been effectively crushed, el-Sisi, it seems, is afraid. Five years after the uprising, the best Egyptians can do is try to find lessons from the tumult that […]

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