Fight Over Calderón Address Shows Struggles of Mexico’s Young Democracy

Fight Over Calderón Address Shows Struggles of Mexico’s Young Democracy

MEXICO CITY -- For decades, the Mexican president's annual Sept. 1 national address was an extravagant bit of political pageantry.

The chief executive would kick off the event by touring the capital's streets in a convertible, waving to adoring crowds under a shower of confetti. Then, he would strut into Congress and speak at length, sometimes for hours, on his administration's achievements of that year.

Today, the event remains a prime example of Mexican political theater, but with an important distinction -- with the advent of democracy, the proceedings are now unscripted and occasionally unruly.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.