Fight Against Islamic State Exposes Iraq’s Persistent Weaknesses

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, French Foreign Affairs Minister Laurent Fabius and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, Paris, France, June 2, 2015 (AP photo by Kamil Zihnioglu).
Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, French Foreign Affairs Minister Laurent Fabius and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, Paris, France, June 2, 2015 (AP photo by Kamil Zihnioglu).

Officials from 20 countries participating in the U.S.-led coalition against the so-called Islamic State (IS) met in Paris today to discuss their strategy against the insurgent group. U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken said that air strikes and support to Iraqi forces are the right course of action against IS, though Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi called IS’ advance in his country a “failure” of the international community. Abadi has faced criticism since assuming office last September that he has not done enough to facilitate Sunni-Shiite reconciliation in Iraq. Iraq’s Sunnis find themselves in a difficult situation—“ground zero in […]

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