Fears of New Atrocities Rise in Burundi as Nkurunziza Ratchets Up His Repression

A young boy and a soldier watch demonstrators climb onto a container used as a barricade in the Cibitoke neighborhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, May 19, 2015 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
A young boy and a soldier watch demonstrators climb onto a container used as a barricade in the Cibitoke neighborhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, May 19, 2015 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).

BUJUMBURA, Burundi—Four years after President Pierre Nkurunziza decided to run for a controversial third term, leading to widespread protests and a government crackdown that killed more than 1,200 people and forced 400,000 to flee, this small East African country is still in the throes of political turmoil. With new elections less than a year away, tensions are rising as the government tightens its grip. In a report released Wednesday, United Nations investigators warned of another wave of possible atrocities ahead of the election amid “a general climate of impunity” in Burundi, where Nkurunziza’s supporters portray him as a “divine” leader. […]

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