Europe and the Mediterranean, Torn Between Separatism and Integration

A demonstration in support of refugees and migrants entering Europe, Barcelona, Spain, March 19, 2016 (AP photo by Emilio Morenatti).
A demonstration in support of refugees and migrants entering Europe, Barcelona, Spain, March 19, 2016 (AP photo by Emilio Morenatti).

BARCELONA, Spain—The countries around the Mediterranean basin are a diverse lot, ranging from the European Union and NATO’s southernmost members to the states of the Balkans, the Middle East and North Africa. One thing almost all of them share is a constant tension from the seemingly contradictory trends toward separation and integration. In the early 21st century, each trajectory has its appeal in this maritime region, but neither represents a panacea. Over time, the Mediterranean will continue to teach us about independence, interdependence and integration as parts of a natural cycle for states and societies. Traveling from the lands of […]

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