Erdogan’s Will to Power Leaves Turkey in Upheaval

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes during a meeting with the leaders of villages at the presidential palace, Ankara, Turkey, Sept. 29, 2015 (AP photo/Presidential Press Service).
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes during a meeting with the leaders of villages at the presidential palace, Ankara, Turkey, Sept. 29, 2015 (AP photo/Presidential Press Service).

In the aftermath of last weekend’s horrific bombings in Ankara, the Turkish people and international observers are trying to understand what went wrong with Turkey, a country that until very recently embodied the hopes of a more peaceful and interconnected Middle East. The answer inevitably leads to one man: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The evidence in the twin suicide attack that killed almost 100 people, making it the deadliest in Turkey’s modern history, points to the self-declared Islamic State. And yet, many people, searching for the bigger picture in Turkey’s crisis, have turned angrily in Erdogan’s direction. Turkey’s president, until […]

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