Ending Yemen’s Multilayered War

A Houthi supporter holds up his rifle during a demonstration against the United States over its decision to designate the Houthis as a foreign terrorist organization, in Sanaa, Yemen, Jan. 25, 2021 (AP photo by Hani Mohammed).
A Houthi supporter holds up his rifle during a demonstration against the United States over its decision to designate the Houthis as a foreign terrorist organization, in Sanaa, Yemen, Jan. 25, 2021 (AP photo by Hani Mohammed).
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For U.S. officials who worked under former President Barack Obama, many of whom are now beginning or contemplating jobs in Joe Biden’s administration, the war in Yemen casts a long shadow. What started on their watch as a primarily internal power struggle has since metastasized into a messy and multilayered conflict. It is the world’s most dire humanitarian crisis, involving alleged violations of international law—many of them perpetrated with American-made arms—and has become a potential trigger for a region-wide conflagration. For much of Biden’s foreign policy team, then, Yemen represents both unfinished business and, potentially, a small but significant piece […]

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