Peace in Libya Will Require More Than Elections

Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, then the prime minister-designate of Libya, during a news conference in Tripoli, Feb. 25, 2021 (AP photo by Hazem Ahmed).
Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, then the prime minister-designate of Libya, during a news conference in Tripoli, Feb. 25, 2021 (AP photo by Hazem Ahmed).
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This time last year, the Libyan capital was caught up in a year-old military campaign that had further internationalized the country’s dangerous divisions. Today, there is a new mood of cautious optimism in Tripoli. In October, negotiators from the two main warring sides—the United Nations-backed Government of National Accord and forces led by Khalifa Haftar, a commander based in eastern Libya—reached a cease-fire agreement that allowed for the resumption of a U.N.-led dialogue process. This in turn paved the way to the formation of Libya’s first unified government since the country slid into civil war in 2014. The new Government […]

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