‘Electric Yerevan’ Protests Put Spotlight on Armenia’s Corruption

An Armenian protester waves a national flag during a protest against a hike in electricity prices, Yerevan, Armenia, June 22, 2015 (Hrant Khachatryan/PAN Photo via AP).
An Armenian protester waves a national flag during a protest against a hike in electricity prices, Yerevan, Armenia, June 22, 2015 (Hrant Khachatryan/PAN Photo via AP).
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Electric Yerevan, the name given to protests in Armenia that started last month, has mostly ended. But the grievances that catapulted anger over a utility rate hike into weeks of protests in the capital, Yerevan, and across the country remain all too relevant. While much international commentary on the protests has examined the geopolitical significance and repercussions of the unrest, both the Armenian government and the thousands of demonstrators themselves have insisted the protests focused on issues a little closer to home. Rather than a repudiation of Russia or a nod to the West, the protests sought to highlight the […]

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