Economic Challenges Dominate Benin’s Wide-Open Presidential Race

Benin President Boni Yayi at the COP21 U.N. Climate Change Conference, outside Paris, France, Nov. 30, 2015 (AP pool photo by Loic Venance).
Benin President Boni Yayi at the COP21 U.N. Climate Change Conference, outside Paris, France, Nov. 30, 2015 (AP pool photo by Loic Venance).
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Last year was a busy one for elections in Africa, and 2016 will bring many more, with polls ranging from the Central African Republic later this month to Ghana in November. The upcoming presidential election in the small West African country of Benin, scheduled for Feb. 28, is notable because there is no incumbent in the race. Outgoing President Boni Yayi, who won election in 2006 and re-election in 2011, is stepping aside out of respect for a constitutional provision that limits presidents to two terms—a growing rarity in a region with a new generation of aspiring presidents-for-life. Benin’s wide-open […]

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