Turkey and NATO May Be at Loggerheads, but They Still Need Each Other

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump at the NATO summit in London, Dec. 4, 2019 (Photo by Michael Kappeler for dpa via AP Images).
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump at the NATO summit in London, Dec. 4, 2019 (Photo by Michael Kappeler for dpa via AP Images).
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The recent NATO summit in London underscored how Turkey’s relations with its allies are becoming increasingly confrontational. In the run-up to the meeting, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened to veto the alliance’s defense plan for Poland and the Baltic states unless key Western powers became more attentive to Turkish interests in Syria. Although Erdogan eventually signed on to the summit’s final communique, the Turks are continuing to stonewall approval of the plan until the West agrees to designate the YPG, a Syrian Kurdish militia, as a terrorist group. Turkey has been vocally complaining about Western support for the YPG […]

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