Despite Recent Stumbling Blocks, the U.S. and China Still Want a Trade Deal

Despite Recent Stumbling Blocks, the U.S. and China Still Want a Trade Deal
Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Vice Premier Liu He attend a meeting with delegates from the 2019 New Economy Forum at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Nov. 22, 2019 (pool photo by Jason Lee of Reuters via AP Images).

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, WPR Newsletter and Engagement Editor Benjamin Wilhelm curates the week’s top news and expert analysis on China.

As U.S. and Chinese negotiators scramble to finalize a “phase one” trade agreement, uncertainty is rising over whether a deal can actually be reached. Beijing has responded angrily to recently passed legislation in the U.S. that targets China for human rights violations, and President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that he could wait until after the 2020 U.S. presidential election to complete a trade deal with China.

Some observers on both sides of the Pacific see these developments as impediments to finalizing the phase one deal, which Trump announced in October but has not been signed. Yet, while there is a possibility that the talks could break down, a trade deal is still in both countries’ best interest.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.